Being a Digital Producer

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Staging children's stories at the National Theatre - Google Cultural Institute

explore-blog:

Isaac Asimov in conversation with Bill Moyers on science vs. religion, education, and the role of science fiction in society – a must-read. 

Asimov gets it right.

explore-blog:

Isaac Asimov in conversation with Bill Moyers on science vs. religion, education, and the role of science fiction in society – a must-read. 

Asimov gets it right.

In my head, I believe I can do these things.

thekidshouldseethis:

An abandoned Victorian Sail factory becomes the stage for London’s Circulus, a circus company that mixes traditional and modern performing arts in found and forgotten spaces around the UK.

With tricking, hand-to-hand, free running, dancing, juggling, tumbling, aerial hoop, cyr wheel, banquine, breakdancing, hand balancing, trampoline and more we transformed this desolate yet decadent space into a thriving hub of movement and creativity.

Also: fireworks!

Previously: Angelica Bongiovonni rides a Cyr wheel, juggler Yanazo wins the JJF2012 first prizeSelyna Bogino juggles basketballs with her feet while upside down (yes, it’s true), and 13 dogs skip rope (yes, seriously). 

via The Awesomer.

Noise Map of 1920s NYC

The Roaring Twenties

A map of NYC in the 1920s sorted by CRANKY NOISE COMPLAINTS.  Click on a noise complaint, you get a description and also usually archival sound or video to go with it.  COOLEST/NERDIEST THING I’VE SEEN ALL WEEK. 

(Source: bookelfe)

Feb 7

For the confusèd among you.

  • Old English (Anglo-Saxon): Eft he axode, hu ðære ðeode nama wære þe hi of comon. Him wæs geandwyrd, þæt hi Angle genemnode wæron. Þa cwæð he, "Rihtlice hi sind Angle gehatene, for ðan ðe hi engla wlite habbað, and swilcum gedafenað þæt hi on heofonum engla geferan beon."
  • Middle English: In þat lond ben trees þat beren wolle, as þogh it were of scheep; whereof men maken clothes, and all þing þat may ben made of wolle. In þat contree ben many ipotaynes, þat dwellen som tyme in the water, and somtyme on the lond: and þei ben half man and half hors, as I haue seyd before; and þei eten men, whan þei may take hem.
  • Early Modern English: But, soft! what light through yonder window breaks? It is the east, and Juliet is the sun. Arise, fair sun, and kill the envious moon, Who is already sick and pale with grief, That thou her maid art far more fair than she Be not her maid, since she is envious; Her vestal livery is but sick and green And none but fools do wear it; cast it off. It is my lady, O, it is my love!
  • Modern English: Moving forward using all my breath. Making love to you was never second best. I saw the world crashing all around your face, never really knowing it was always mesh and lace. I'll stop the world and melt with you. You've seen the difference and it's getting better all the time. There's nothing you and I won't do. I'll stop the world and melt with you.
Nov 3

digitalproducer:

Be a part of making theatre history.

We want to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the theatre by exhibiting YOUR memories of the National Theatre. We need you to generously donate your experiences in the theatre for that to be possible. Once donated they will be a part of the NT archive forever but will also feature in a cool interactive as part of the celebrations in October 2013.

Watch the video to see Tom Hiddleston, Lenny Henry and Luke Treadway’s memories of the National Theatre and then give us your own. Please tell us about it here: www.nationaltheatre.org.uk/yournt

Share this on your blog, facebook, twitter, by word of mouth, so that we have a treasure chest full of memories of the theatre.

Thank-you

Your National Theatre Trailer (by NationalTheatre)

Did you enjoy last nights NTLive 50th birthday celebration? Then please take 5 minutes to do this and help create something really special.

michael-peers:

Here’s the full collection of Scene Changes Platform events, a reflection on how theatre has changed over the past 50 years which was one of the many ways that National Theatre marked its 50th anniversary. They’re fascinating.

This is a brilliant film about race in the performance history of Othello. I can say that because I didn’t produce it, hats off to Sita Thomas.

national-theatre:

This film looks at the four productions of Othello staged at the National Theatre and how the representation of the character’s race has changed.

Featured in this film: Professor Tony Howard, Adrian Lester and Professor Carol Chillington Rutter

For more content on Shakespeare productions at the National Theatre click here.

michael-peers:

A beautiful film documenting the firework display at the National Theatre to mark its 50th anniversary. Created by Tim Marrinan.

national-theatre:

A short film of the fireworks display we had last night on the South Bank to mark our 50th anniversary on 22 October 2013.

maxistentialist:

Cabel Sasser at XOXO fest

This is a talk by one of my heroes, who rarely (maybe never?) speaks in public. It’s about the fear that can come from making things you love. It made me cry.

This talk is really important to me, I bet that if you make things it will be important to you too.

The Hour: 60 minutes before curtain-up at the National Theatre - exclusive video | Stage | theguardian.com

WATCH THIS,

I produced this film for the National Theatre. It follows six actors preparing to go on stage, in the hour up to their first entrance, at the National Theatre. They’re all amazing and very generous to let us film them. it’s fascinating and if anyone wants to know what the real job of acting is, this will show you.

I’m very proud of it.

SHARE PLEASE

Oct 9

heressomeawesome:

Viral Video Alert: Carrie Coffee Shop Stunt

18 million views in 2 days! If us internet folks who don’t watch commercials (or go outside really) didn’t know about the upcoming Carrie movie, we do now. From a creative stand point, I love the idea of setting up stage in unexpected places. But I do feel a little bad for the casual commuters getting their morning coffee. I’m sure as hell not ready for this at 8am.

Awesome video

I’m from the United States and came to London for the first time in 2003 when I was nine years old. My family and I were primarily there to see theatre, and the first play we saw was His Girl Friday at the National. I will always remember it because it was the start of a wonderful eleven-year relationship with the National - I am now twenty and have come back to London nearly every summer since, and I always go to the National. It it such an amazing place and I am constantly amazed by its bold work. The National is such a community for all lovers of theatre, no matter where we come from. Whenever I come back to the National, it feels like coming home.

- A memory from our project Your National Theatre where we are collecting your stories to celebrate our 50th anniversary. Tell us yours. (via national-theatre)

Donate your memory and be a part of British Theatre history.

happymathilda:

If you love theatre, National Theatre Podcasts is a goldmine!!

#love it!!

visual masterpieces: national theatre's frankenstein